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As a Gizmodo commenter put it, there's a new reason to jailbreak your iPhone every day.  Today's is iSync for iPhone by Francisois, a GUI application that lets you sync your jailbroken iPhone or iPod Touch via WiFi.  Don't get too in a tizzy just yet - syncing is limited to one folder at a time for now, but Appletell.com reports that "iTunes, photos, Safari bookmarks, and contacts" syncing are including amongst upcoming features. 

Personally, I don't mind the wired syncing as I have extra iPhone-compatible cables from previous iPods I've owned, so I just keep one at home and one at the office and a third for charging/audio docking on the bedside table.  And syncing charges the battery, to boot.  But wireless syncing is something lots of people are interested in and, frankly, something iPhone can and should do (Zune does it, after all). 

So kudos to Francisois - check out the app over at Everythingicafe.

Also, iPhones unlocked via Iphone Sim Free may now be upgraded to use a jailbroken version of firmware version 1.1.2.  I haven't yet tried this myself - upgrading to 1.1.1 took longer than anticipated and while the 1.1.2 upgrade itself looks pretty easy (close to one-click), there's an extra step involved to re-activate EDGE, which may well mean a bunch of steps to re-activate my T-Zones Web proxy.  I'll save this one for when I've finished my three thousand other unfinished projects. 

But if you're interested, you can check out the how-to over on CrunchGear.


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