Nokia: function over form will always win

Ari Robbins
Contributing Editor from Atlanta, GA
Published: July 16, 2010

There's no doubt the iPhone 4 'scandal', or 'Antennagate,' or whatever you'd like to call it has turned some heads.  At the very least it developed enough attention to call for a press conference today where CEO Steve Jobs offered a few solutions.  But it looks as though negative press for one company can be used to boost the image of others who may be having difficulties of their own.  Today, Nokia released a statement suggesting that in the event of a conflict during the design phase of a  phone, they "prioritize antenna performance over physical design."  No kidding?  The statement also says that "Nokia has invested thousands of man hours in studying human behavior, including how people hold their phones."

Recently, Nokia has lost the support of Ricky Cadden, the Symbian-Guru, and while Anssi Vanjoki, the newly appointed Chief of Mobile Solutions has said "the fightback starts now," I can't help but get the feeling that kicking Apple while they're down isn't really going to get the job done.  What do you think?

Via Engadget

 

"Antenna design is a complex subject and has been a core competence at Nokia for decades, across hundreds of phone models. Nokia was the pioneer in internal antennas; the Nokia 8810, launched in 1998, was the first commercial phone with this feature.

Nokia has invested thousands of man hours in studying human behavior, including how people hold their phones for calls, music playing, web browsing and so on. As you would expect from a company focused on connecting people, we prioritize antenna performance over physical design if they are ever in conflict.

In general, antenna performance of a mobile device/phone may be affected with a tight grip, depending on how the device is held. That's why Nokia designs our phones to ensure acceptable performance in all real life cases, for example when the phone is held in either hand. Nokia has invested thousands of man hours in studying how people hold their phones and allows for this in designs, for example by having antennas both at the top and bottom of the phone and by careful selection of materials and their use in the mechanical design."